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Design Technology

Design Technology

Vision: 

At Blackpool our goal is to provide the children with skills and knowledge to produce imaginative and creative products. Design and technology is an inspiring, practical and rigorous subject that teaches children to design, make and evaluate products that solve real and relevant problems. In order to do this, children will need to draw on a broad range of subject knowledge and use skills and disciplines such as maths, science, computing and art. The intention will be for pupils to learn how to take responsible risks, become resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable. Children will be taught to consider health and safety whilst using age appropriate tools.  A key-stage appropriate progressional programme of study will be provided allowing cross-curricular links through topic themes, to maximize the practical and exciting ways for pupils to demonstrate their acquisition of skills and  knowledge in this area.  

The skills taught in Design and Technology will be used discretely across a broad spectrum during the academic year, for example, cooking, gardening and outdoor education.  

Design and Technology is a key component of many of our curriculum drivers at Blackpool. Most obviously Creativity’, but also ‘Life Long Skills’ and ‘Communications and Connections’. They should know how Design and Technology has shaped our history and understand its impact on daily life and the wider world.  

Pupils will have 2 years in which to complete all of the learning objectives set out in 2 years Curriculum plan. For example, teachers will plan in the Year 3 and 4 learning objectives across their 2 year rolling programme to best make meaningful cross-curricular links within each unit of work. The same will be applied for Year 1/2 and Year 5/6. Reception will plan for their own one year programme.    

 

Aims: 

The national curriculum for design and technology aims to ensure that all pupils:  

  • develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world  

  •  build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users  

  •  critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others 

  • understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook. 

Early Years 

Expressive design and technology will be taught discretely through a mix of adult directed and child initiated activities. Creative opportunities will be available in both the indoor and outdoor learning environment, encouraging children to explore through continuous provision. The whole child approach will be adopted and therefore the characteristics of effective learning are key when planning and enabling environments.  

Children are born ready, able and eager to learn. They actively reach out to interact with other people, and in the world around them. Development is not an automatic process, however. It depends on each unique child having opportunities to interact in positive relationships and enabling environments.  

Students are introduced to early skills, which lay sound foundations for future learning, such as: 

  • They safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.  

  • Children use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways thinking about uses and purposes. 

  • They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, role play and stories.  

Key Stage 1 

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an interactive process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts [for example, the home and school, gardens and playgrounds, the local community, industry and the wider environment].  

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:  

Design  

  • design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria  

  •  generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology  

Make  

  • select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing]  

  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics  

Evaluate 

  • explore and evaluate a range of existing products  

  • evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria and detail how improvements could be made. 

 

 

Technical knowledge  

  • build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable 

  • explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their products. 

  

Key Stage 2 

Key stage 2 Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an interactive process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts [for example, the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment].  

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:  

Design  

  • use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups 

  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design  

Make 

  • select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately 

select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities  

 

Evaluate  

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products 

  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work  

  • understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world  

Technical knowledge 

  • apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures  

  • understand and use mechanical systems in their products [for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages]  

understand and use electrical systems in their products [for example, series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors] 

  • apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products. 

 

Assessment 

Pupils will be assessed on their design and technology knowledge and achievements linked back to the key curricular goals. Each sequence of lessons will result in an evaluation of the work completed. Assessment can be carried out in a number of ways, these can include; peer assessment, teacher assessment and pupil presentations and celebrations.   

 

Design Technology Rolling School Long Term Plan (Rolling Programme of Study)

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